• Safia A

How Sensory Play Benefits Language Development



Sensory play benefit language development- One of the best things about playing through sensory exploration is the benefit to many different areas of development!

Using many senses at once allows children to develop language, cognitive, motor, social and imaginative skills.

Few examples- 1) USING DESCRIPTIVE VOCABULARY

Squishy, bumpy, smooth, sticky, gooey, cold with different textures like playdough, slime and you can talk about it This feels (slimy, smooth, cold, etc.) to me.” “Have you ever felt anything else like this? Does it remind you of anything?”

2) USING ACTION WORDS DURING SENSORY PLAY

You can also encourage the use of action words while playing with shaving foam, water play, grains.

“Let’s mix it!” “You’re pouring very carefully.” “Which spoon should we use to stir?”

3) USING MOVEMENT ACTIVITIES TO Promote Speech and Language Development

-a) Motor Planning, Articulation, and the Vestibular System

For one, the vestibular system helps your child’s brain with MOTOR PLANNING . And motor planning is important to speech development.

Speech requires that your child move an unbelievable number of tiny muscles –– and coordinate those movements –– every time he produces even one single word! And what if your little one cannot adequately process information related to muscle movements? It’s possible that this manifests as a speech disorder. This might mean apraxia of speech or an articulation disorder.

b) Receptive Language and the Vestibular System

You probably knew that your child’s auditory (hearing) system was involved in his ability to listen to you. But that’s not the only one! When it comes to receptive language, the vestibular system works with your child’s auditory system.

Why? Because not only does he need to hear your words when you speak to him, but he needs to determine where those words are coming from and who is producing them. And then he needs to focus on those words to process them. If he’s unable to do any of these things, he’ll show difficulties with skills like following directions, understanding questions, responding to his name. Later, he might struggle with engaging in conversation.

These are just SOME IDEAS of how you can encourage language development through sensory play. But even if you don’t do any prompting on purpose the play itself will promote growth.

IN ANY CASE ITS REQUIRED TO CHECK WITH YOUR THERAPIST AS EACH CHILD IS DIFFERENT AND HAVE DIFFERENT SENSORY NEED.




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